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CNBC Poll: Trump Should Not Appoint New Justice


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CNBC Poll in association with Change Research finds that likely voters in battleground states believe the next Supreme Court Justice should not be appointed by Trump if he loses.

According to the latest CNBC/Change Research “States of Play” Poll, 52% of likely voters in the battleground states (Arizona, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin) and 57% of likely national voters believe President Trump should not be able to appoint the next Supreme Court nominee if he loses the election in November.

43% of likely battleground voters and 37% of likely national voters believe that he should be able to fill the open seat even if he loses.

Both nationally and in the battleground states, one in ten likely voters say that the ability to appoint a Supreme Court Justice is the single most important factor in their choice for president in November. Another 57% of likely battleground voters and 58% of likely national voters say that it is a very important factor.

According to the poll, 54% of likely national voters believe presidential nominee Joe Biden and Democrats would do a better job nominating the next Supreme Court Justice versus 46% for President Trump and Republicans. In the battleground states, 51% of likely voters prefer Biden and Democrats versus 49% for President Trump and Republicans.

Full results of the CNBC/Change Research “States of Play” Poll will be revealed throughout CNBC’s Business Day programming today with additional coverage on-air and online Thursday, September 24th.

Methodology

Between September 18-20, 2020, Change Research surveyed 1,430 likely general election voters nationally and 3,018 likely general election voters in the battleground states of Arizona, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. The margin of error as traditionally calculated among the national sample is ±2.59% and among the battleground sample is ±1.79%. Change Research reaches voters via targeted online ads that point people to an online survey instrument.

Its Dynamic Online Sampling establishes and continuously rebalances advertising targets across region, age, gender, race, and partisanship to dynamically deliver large samples that accurately reflect the demographics of a population. In the national survey and the survey of battleground states, post-stratification was done on gender, age, region, education, race, and 2016 presidential vote.

For additional methodological information, visit www.changeresearch.com/methodology.